Works > Have a Heart

Painted silicone heart pendant that represents a commitment to an open heart and empathetic attitude.
Silicone, gold chain
3in x 10in
2018
Painted silicone heart pendant that represents a commitment to an open heart and empathetic attitude.
Silicone, gold chain
3in x 10in
2018
Silicone nose sinking into the wall, tethered by a cotton thread and attached zine on the nose piercing.
Painted silicone with septum piercing and cotton thread
~3 in x 4 in (size variable)
2018
Handmade zine containing rumination on visibility and desirability, attached to silicone nose via thread binding being tied to the nose piercing.
Handmade zine
1.5 in x 3 in
2018
Plaster hand cast with red acrylic nail on the middle finger
Plaster, acrylic nail
3in x 5in x 2in
2018
Flowers, for Our Protection
Silicone on plaster cast with washi tape and colored pencil on acetate
6in x 5in
2018
Flowers, for Our Protection (detail)
Silicone on plaster cast with washi tape and colored pencil on acetate
5in x 6in
2018
A Headache Unrelieved I
Plaster head with wig
Size variable
2018
A Headache Unrelieved II
Plaster head with silicone skin
Size variable
2019
A Headache Relieved
Durational performance activating Headache Unrelieved I & II
Size variable
2018

Not purely sweet nor purely bitter, our conscious experience of a mind and body co-inhabiting ‘the self’ is hardly understandable or easy. As we move through this world, we question, explore, and desire to bring attention to experiences of the body in an effort to make sense of it. My intention for Have a Heart is to highlight some of the silently swallowed ideas and perceptions that are projected onto LGBTQ+ individuals’ bodies as they exist in society, and to encourage empathy in the viewer. The driving inquiry behind this project was to ask: in what ways do social judgments of appearance and bodies affect a person, especially when the individual has historically been othered?

Constructing specific appearances and performing competitive and healing expressions of self-actualization–whether embracing identity or attempting to obscure it–is a common occurrence within queer individuals’ existences as we respond to societal reactions. In an effort to better understand the range of experience, I participated in one-on-one conversations with ten others about their thoughts on the body, the habitation of the body, and how the body functions in a social realm. From there, I captured the bodily form in adorned fragments to root the conceptual in the physical realm; exploring concepts such as alienation, limitation, endurance, and overcoming.